Contemporary Fashion 4

Last week, our penultimate session, we were challenged to ” just do it”.  Get out your fabric and your prints, look again at your models, and create a garment or a piece of a garment, on the dummy.

I looked again at some of mine and inspiration didn’t strike.  So I fell back on the only wearable design in the range.  Here it is again. The one on the left.

The one I'll probably make is on the left.  It has the shape from the umbrella segments plus a stencil from the "spokes" of the umbrella

The one I’ll probably make is on the left. It has the shape from the umbrella segments plus a stencil from the “spokes” of the umbrella

Of course, I then altered it as I went. I wanted the final garment to reflect the narrow hems of umbrella fabric.  Also, the curves or ruffles of an umbrella which is not fully folded nor fully open should be there somewhere.  The “spokes” of metal that lie underneath the fabric and control, with  stitching through holes in the metal, the movement of the fabric panels had to be there.  Then, finally, I wanted the segments or panels of the garment to reflect the main shapes I’d deconstructed.  Ultimately, Kim’s initial message to us had been to “push the silhouette” so I tried to extend some of the outlines.

I’ll post the final garment shot after the last class and graduation this Saturday!

I made a "spoke" out of black felt and lining fabric with stitching and a large grommet to represent the hole that is stitched through to attach the umbrella panels.

I made a “spoke” out of black felt and lining fabric with stitching and a large grommet to represent the hole that is stitched through to attach the umbrella panels.

Black bias trim on the neck to frame something (?)underneath. Narrow hem a la umbrella hems.

Black bias trim on the neck to frame something (?)underneath. Narrow hem a la umbrella hems.

An underskirt in the shape of one umbrella panel.

An underskirt in the shape of one umbrella panel.

The printed fabric became a top.The printed (umbrella folds) fabric became a top with hand stitched additions where necessary to balance the design.

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